Construction takes over chapel, walkways

By: ROGER HOKE – Staff Writer

_MG_6692

Chapel rennovations will be completed by August 2015 according to Beth Keyes vice president of facilities management. Chris Santucci/Photo Editor


As University of Dayton students and faculty return for the semester, they will encounter changes made to campus, the result of several construction projects begun over the summer.

While construction work is common between the spring and fall semesters, students should be aware of some renovations affecting large portions of the community.

“The biggest focus has been on the chapel,” said Vice President for Facilities Management Beth Keyes. She said the chapel will not be finished until next August.

“We have a temporary Chapel on the first floor of Chaminade Hall,” said Keyes. The Mass schedule for the new location can be found on the university website.

Students in the fields of education and health sciences will be specifically effected by the renovations.

“The School of Education and Health Sciences has been moved from Chaminade and Frericks, and they are now all together on the sixth floor of CPC,” said Keyes. All courses in the school, as well as its department and offices, have moved to the College Park Center, located at 1529 Brown St.

“The whole project was a LEED Gold Project,” said Keyes. The university has been following the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design specifications on all projects and renovations for the past several years, including the Chapel, said Keyes.

Plaques on the sixth floor of the CPC specify the procedures followed to meet the LEED standards, including the materials used for and recycling techniques used during the project.

The creation of a new athletic center was responsible for a portion of the summer construction activity.

“Reichard Hall will be renovated for the new Olsen Athletic Center,” said Keyes. She said student athletes will be able to use the 10,000 square foot facility for training and conditioning upon its completion in December.

Alongside Reichard’s renovation, the Frericks Center will convert current space for more athletic offices.

Another construction project added an outdoor basketball court to campus, located by the Recplex.

“I like the excavation of the land so that it could be used to better accommodate everyone’s interests,” said Joe Buffo, a junior communication major.

A collaboration between the university and Emerson Climate Technologies is moving ahead with construction plans for a research center, according to a udayton.edu July 30 news release titled “Global Innovation.”

“Emerson Climate Technologies and UD will partner for the 40,000 square foot center to develop next-generation heating, ventilation, air conditioning and refrigeration technology,” wrote Dave Larsen of the Dayton Daily News.

“This is big for engineering and business students,” said Keyes. Emerson Climate Technologies will provide an opportunity for University of Dayton undergraduates and graduates to work on campus.

“We were really busy all summer; it was smaller stuff spread all over campus. The moment all students leave, we get to work,” said Keyes.

“The winter months were hard on the pavement walkways, so we worked hard on them,” said Keyes. She said the sidewalk repair will be routine for years to come.

Keyes said the residence halls received the usual adjustments and modifications necessary for new students to move in, including the fixing of damages by past residents. Neighborhood homes also received work, especially the windows of houses, many of which needed replacement.

She said the commuter lounge in Kennedy Union saw minor renovations over the summer.

Future plans include the opening of the renovated Immaculate Conception Chapel, the demolition of the old music-theater building and the renovation of Baujan Field and its turf, Keyes said.